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I didn't like what Narrativity was before this.

When I provided branding services, my branding package was RM700. The package included the logo and sublogos, brand colours, brand fonts, brand patterns, 4 illustrations and 2 collateral items (packaging, etc).

Good money right?

But when I got the payment, it completely TURNED ME OFF. The money didn't give me joy -- it only reminded of the stress.

That's when I knew I couldn't offer branding services anymore.

Last week, I painted an overview of WHAT you can rebrand for your brand. One of it is offerings and that's what I'll be focusing on today.

Yes, you definitely have an offering.

All brands have offerings, aka things you OFFER to people.

  • PAID offerings, like your product or service.
  • FREE offerings, like your blog posts, vlogs or social media content.

And sometimes, along the way, you just don't feel happy with what you're offering. You either grow to hate your offering, or you just feel...bored. And empty.

But despite that, it's natural to think, Is it OK to just change?

Let me tell you now: It is always the RIGHT time to rebrand your offerings.

You don't have to be stuck with the same offerings until you close up shop. It's *your* brand. It grows with you and it's not static.

So the question now is -- what steps can you take to rebrand your offerings? Let's look at the THREE major steps that you can take.

 

Rebrand #1: Change to a new income stream (or package it up with your current offering).

An income stream is your brand's source of income. It usually comes in 3 different forms:

  1. Client Work (or service) -- Baking and decorating a personalized cake for a customer.
  2. Product -- Selling ready-made cakes.
  3. Teaching -- Conducting a workshop on baking cakes.

All three examples above involve a cake, but HOW the cake's offered to people is different.

All of the income stream come with their own pros and cons, but you might be suitable for one income stream more than the other.

For example, you might be someone who's friendly and loves solving people's problems. You're also assertive and you don't take people's shit. The interactions with clients give you energy.

Then Client Work might be a perfect fit for you.

So if you're currently just selling products and feel that it doesn't excite you -- change it to Client Work. You're still with the same "thing", but you're offering it differently.

Alternatively, instead of choosing between income streams -- package two income streams together for a really dynamic offering.

I'm still very, very passionate about branding. If you know me in real life, you'd know that I'm a pretty easygoing person who prefers to agree with whatever other people are saying.

Branding is the one topic that I can really argue about with other people. BUT, I can't do Client Work because it puts a crazy amount of pressure on me.

SO...I've shifted to my own combo of Product + Teaching. My Starter Branding Kit for Bloggers is a Product that *teaches* people about how to brand themselves as bloggers.

Still about branding, but a combo of Product + Teaching instead of Client Work. :)

OK another example. Let's say that you still like Client Work, but you keep running into problems where your clients don't understand how much work goes into baking really good-looking cakes.

You can package up your Client Work with a little bit of Teaching. Each cake order will now come with an educational booklet on baking. Like baking techniques or differences between ingredients.

This way, you get to mitigate the cons of the income stream and enjoy the pros more.

>>>> If this is the route you want to go for, list down all your strengths and weaknesses. And then change / package it up with the income stream(s) that plays to your strengths.

 

Rebrand #2: Widen or narrow down your target customers/audience.

Target customers/audience are the people you want. The people who are supposed to buy from you or enjoy your free offerings.

Knowing who to target allows you to brand more effectively. Like, a restaurant who wants to target fine-dining customers won't brand itself like a fast food restaurant. (Think Nobu vs. McDonald's)

But sometimes, you can accidentally target a customer group that is TOO BIG or TOO SMALL.

Let me give you an example.

Business: Event planning

  • TOO BIG: Everyone who wants to hold an event.
  • TOO SMALL: Birthday parties for little boys who only like Superman.

If you target a group that is TOO BIG or TOO SMALL, your offering won't be personalized / tailored / special enough.

  • TOO BIG: Different events have different requirements to be successful. If you don't specify what you can do, customers won't be confident about your ability to handle their particular event.
  • TOO SMALL: What about little boys who like Ironman? Are you gonna say No to them? (Plus, you won't get to really exercise your creativity.)

BTW, this also totally applies if you have a blog about event planning.

>>>> In order to fix your targeting, you need to answer these questions:

If your group was TOO BIG, think about all your past experiences. Was there any particular situation / type of customers that you liked? When did you feel most confident?

If you group was TOO SMALL, look at your current offering and remove some of the 'filters'. Think about other groups of people who might enjoy what you're offering. Or people who have the same problems as your current customers.

 

Rebrand #3: Test stuff using 'Special Projects' and 'Limited Editions'.

Rebranding can be very scary. You just don't know if your current people (customers / audience) will enjoy your new offerings. And that's enough to make you not want to take the first step.

As I mentioned a little bit in the last email -- rebranding doesn't have to be ALL OR NOTHING. You can tweak your brand or overhaul it completely, it's up to you.

And you can do tweak or overhaul under the concept of Special Projects or Limited Editions.

Let's say that you have a blog about fashion. But lately you've felt like you wanted to write about your experience as a parent. Two completely different things right? Would your fashionable audience enjoy reading about parenting? (You just don't know)

What you can do when you want to introduce a new thing to your offering is by introducing it for a limited amount of time, aka the Special Project.

Instead of changing completely from fashion to parenting, you write a blog post series on parenting. Three blog posts that talk about your experience as a parent, maybe merge some fashion and parenting tips together (how to dress up your child for Malaysian weather?) and that's it.

At the end of the three blog posts, you add: "Did you like this series? Let me know in the comments!"

Ask for feedback from your audience. And then analyse these two things:

  1. Did my audience enjoy the [Special Project]?
  2. And most importantly, did I enjoy the [Special Project]? Did it feel right?

If YES to both, great! Dive in! Otherwise, you might want to experiment a little bit more by doing more Special Projects.

(In the coming emails, I'll touch on the unfortunate effects of rebranding -- like having customers not like your rebranded brand -- and how to deal with it.)

It's the same thing if you have PAID offerings. Instead of replacing your inventory with totally new products, add some Limited Edition stuff.

For example, instead of launching a new fashion line with a completely different style (think rocker chic to modern corporate), why not come up with a Limited Edition item or two?

When you want to sell something new than what your people are used to, it's always good to test the market first before investing a lot into the new product.

If the response to your Limited Edition item is good, then you know what you can do. :)

>>>> This is one of my favourite methods! Be creative and find ways to merge two interests/passions to create your own unique, creative THING. You can do it!

 

Which route would you like to try? Let me know in the comments below! :)

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